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Learning Technologies

This part of the University website is dedicated to improving student learning and teaching methods. Here, Lecturers will find information and resources related to improving, and evolving, styles of higher education learning and teaching. On this page, you will find existing, current techniques and technologies detailed below that aim to develop and enhance the quality of learning and teaching at the University. 

 

E-Books

What are E-books?

E-books are rapidly outgrowing sales of conventional paper media. Student can carry around hundreds of books on a single electronic device, access them remotely and manipulate content digitally. E-books can be read on computers, smartphones and other e-book readers such as iPads and Amazon Kindle’s.

How can E-books be used to advance student learning?

There is a wide range of e-books available to all courses. E-books can be used to develop learning and teaching in many ways. Firstly, they compliment an already ubiquitous use of mobile technology that students are familiar with and support a wide range of learning styles. Secondly, e-books often supply supplementary material designed to enhance and test student learning. Thirdly, some e-books allow for annotations to be made and then be shared with other students. As a result, such annotations can aid student learning by making reference to other e-books or sources of information, making the e-book a diverse learning technology. 

Why should I use E-books?

The use of e-books for learners would compliment a student body abundantly owning and using smartphones and e-book readers such as iPads to access information. The provision of e-books is rapidly increasing, with many textbooks available in both a paper published and electronic format. In many instances, e-books provide supplementary materials to support learning that can further develop learning. E-books are widely available to students at Liverpool Hope (for example, through NetLibrary), and the university has access to numerous academic texts available in electronic format. The infrastructure for using e-books is widely available to many courses, and these can be easily referenced to in course materials and online reading lists.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where E-books have been incorporated in higher education institutions: 

1)     The University of Leicester have used e-books and mobile technologies in their distance programmes and report numerous benefits: http://online.cofa.unsw.edu.au/learning-to-teach-online/ltto-episodes?view=video&video=231

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of E-books in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This article on The Guardian website discusses the use of e-books and how they benefit students: http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/mar/15/ebooks-academic-future-universities-steven-schwartz 

E-Portfolios

What are E-Portfolios?

E-Portfolios are places where students can electronically collect their work and ideas dynamically over the lifetime of a course. E-Portfolios can encourage students to become more critically reflective learners. Such work can include text, electronic files, multimedia, images, blog entries and hyperlinks. E-Portfolios are used as pedagogic tools to enhance and evolve learning and teaching styles, skills development and students’ reflective learning as well as supporting personal development and planning during progression through courses.

How can E-Portfolios be used to advance student learning?

E-Portfolios help students to reflect on what they have learned over the course of an educational programme and how they plan to improve in the future. Such skills are integral to the development of students being critical thinks and helps to develop important transferable skills relating to their writing abilities, organisation and development as autonomous learners. E-Portfolios can facilitate students’ reflection on their own learning, leading to an increased awareness of learning strategies and their personal learning needs and the improvements required to enhance their learning to an advanced level.

Why should I use E-Portfolios?

E-Portfolios allow students to collect and manage their work electronically over the lifetime of a course. As such, e-portfolios are also demonstrations of the user’s abilities to maintain such a diverse platform of electronic learning. The rapid use of e-portfolios by many universities has led to numerous advantages for learning and teaching. This learning and teaching strategy leads to the development of student’s learning as well as becoming a diverse teaching and assessment technology.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where E-Portfolios have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     Newcastle University developed an E-Portfolio in 2002 as part of a collaborative project and have explored the pedagogic benefits of its use: http://www.eportfolios.ac.uk/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of E-Portfolios in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    The University of Nottingham has a detailed webpage on the advantages of e-portfolios: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/teaching/tools/eportfolios/index.aspx

2)    This YouTube video demonstrates the use of e-portfolios at the University of Derby: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZsfvBqBrcY

Blogs and Forums

What are Blogs and Forums?

Blogs are a major source of user-generated content on the internet. They are a quick, accessible and easy to make method which are a great way of giving students a wider audience to their assessed work. This results in students having access to multiple sources of feedback from peers rather tan just the one tutor, which in itself can lead to enhanced understanding and self-awareness. The shared environment allows students to view good places of assessed work produced by their peers, and by comparison with their own work, understand where the weaknesses highlighted in feedback on their own work lie. Students and tutors can develop their own blogging sites (on sites such as blogspot) that allow for multiple sources of feedback and the development of their understanding of subject matter. Twitter is a social media micro-blogging service, which is popular amongst students along with Facebook. Twitter is a great tool for sending and receiving short burst of information, normally relating to developing current stories gaining traction as well as development in other subject disciplines to groups of interested people. Twitter can be a useful learning and teaching tool in a Higher Education context as it has the potential to reach a wide audience. Online discussions (or Forums) can be used to extend learning beyond the boundaries of the classroom. Discussion forums can be set up in Moodle and other platforms.

How can Blogs and Forums be used to advance student learning?

The past 5 years have seen a skyrocketing of educational blogs in various subject areas. Such blogs are written by leaders and experts in their respective disciplines and students can encounter the most current, original and disciplinary significant information through blogs and forums. Blogs and forums are now perceived to be a significant online resource of academic information. In addition, a forum component can help develop and engage students by participating and collaborating in academic debates. Sites such as Twitter allow for immediate access to current events which helps students to engage and relate theoretical frameworks to real world contexts.

Why should I use Blogs and Forums?

Blogs and forums are massive sources of academic information. Frequently, this information is current and important to the relevant discipline. In addition, students can participate in academic debates which leads to higher levels of engagement and the development of subject knowledge. Writing blogs and contributing to forums are a useful learning and teaching technology as well as an assessment tool. This learning and teaching technology is an innovative method for engaging students in academic debates and appealing to a wider range of students learning styles.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where Blogs and Forums have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     This YouTube video highlights a case study of the use of blogs from the University of South Wales for peer feedback and discussion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4HLGRzhWBs&feature=related

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of Blogs and Forums in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1) This YouTube video discusses the relevance of blogs and their role in disseminating information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN2I1pWXjXI

2) This website provides a guide to the use of blogs in teaching: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/ultimate-guide-to-use-of-blogs-in.html

Flipped Classrooms

What is Flipping the Classroom?

“Flipping the Classroom”, is the process of diverting the content usually delivered by passive, “chalk and talk” methods to online media outside the classroom. There are vast resources on the internet (e.g. Kahn Academy) where students can access entire courses in their chosen subject. Flipping the classroom asks students to access this content before arriving at the classroom, freeing classroom time up for more interesting activities. Flipping the classroom is a form of blended learning so that lecturers can spend more time interacting with students instead of focusing on instruction.

How can Flipping the Classroom be used to advance student learning?

There are numerous advantages to flipping the classroom. In conjunction with the use of learning technologies, a flipped classroom increases student engagement; interaction; development of subject knowledge; and increases participation and collaboration amongst students. These advantages lead to an enhanced performance by students in many aspects of their course, particularly in their assessments and engagement with subject content.

Why should I “flip the classroom”?

A flipped classroom is a learning and teaching technique employed by many lecturers. It is the emphasis on using student-lecturer content time for discussion rather than instruction which attracts educators to this technique. The multiple advantages of developing student’s subject knowledge; focusing on interaction and discussion; enhancing engagement and participation in core subject content result from the use of this learning and teaching strategy.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where flipping the classroom has been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     Salman Khan discusses the use of the Khan Academy and flipping the classroom to “reinvent education”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTFEUsudhfs

2)    This YouTube video explains the reasons why educators “flip the classroom” and the methods of delivery of academic information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2H4RkudFzlc

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of flipping the classroom in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This learning solutions website provides a helpful infographic about flipping the classroom and its outcomes: http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/

The Center for Instructional Technology at Duke University provides more information and resources about flipping the classroom. Click here for more information: http://cit.duke.edu/flipping-the-classroom/

Learning Objects

What are Learning Objects?

Learning Objects (LO) are digital learning resources often found in learning repositories, which normally take the form of interactive workshops, lecture material and worksheets. Learning Object repositories are websites that serve as a holding place for collections of teaching and learning objects. Learning Objects are reusable, durable and accessible. They provide instructional content, practice based elements and assessments for smaller, self-contained units of learning which comprise a particular element of a course 

How can Learning Objects be used to advance student learning?

Learning Objects have the capability to advance student learning in numerous ways. Learning Objects can be viewed as blocks that can be combined and reused to create a stimulating and diverse course design. This method of learning supports a wide range of learning techniques by students and are used to support the different kinds of online activities and interaction patterns with lecturers. This results in a flexible approach to learning as well as providing students with more choices about how, when and where they learn.

Why should I use Learning Objects?

Learning Objects offer a new conceptualisation of the learning process. Rather than the traditional identified portions of time, they provide smaller, self-contained units of learning with a number of different components. These components include: instructional content, practice based elements and assessment.  Extracting units of instruction from larger course structures have the potential to transform the design and delivery of educational content. Once stored in a repository, students can access them to support learning. The use of Learning Objects as a learning and teaching technology is one more tool that leads to a diversification in learning and assessment methods for students 

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where learning objects have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     In this YouTube video, Salman Khan discusses the use of Learning Objects in education: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM95HHI4gLk&playnext=1&list=PL38AD3C06766D487E&feature=results_main

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of learning objects in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This document provides a detailed overview and information about developing Learning Objects in higher education: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0219.pdf

2)    This wiki provides a detailed overview about the use and implementation of learning objects: http://wiki.alt.ac.uk/index.php/Learning_objects_and_repositories

E-Books

What are E-books?

E-books are rapidly outgrowing sales of conventional paper media. Student can carry around hundreds of books on a single electronic device, access them remotely and manipulate content digitally. E-books can be read on computers, smartphones and other e-book readers such as iPads and Amazon Kindle’s.

How can E-books be used to advance student learning?

There is a wide range of e-books available to all courses. E-books can be used to develop learning and teaching in many ways. Firstly, they compliment an already ubiquitous use of mobile technology that students are familiar with and support a wide range of learning styles. Secondly, e-books often supply supplementary material designed to enhance and test student learning. Thirdly, some e-books allow for annotations to be made and then be shared with other students. As a result, such annotations can aid student learning by making reference to other e-books or sources of information, making the e-book a diverse learning technology. 

Why should I use E-books?

The use of e-books for learners would compliment a student body abundantly owning and using smartphones and e-book readers such as iPads to access information. The provision of e-books is rapidly increasing, with many textbooks available in both a paper published and electronic format. In many instances, e-books provide supplementary materials to support learning that can further develop learning. E-books are widely available to students at Liverpool Hope (for example, through NetLibrary), and the university has access to numerous academic texts available in electronic format. The infrastructure for using e-books is widely available to many courses, and these can be easily referenced to in course materials and online reading lists.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where E-books have been incorporated in higher education institutions: 

1)     The University of Leicester have used e-books and mobile technologies in their distance programmes and report numerous benefits: http://online.cofa.unsw.edu.au/learning-to-teach-online/ltto-episodes?view=video&video=231

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of E-books in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This article on The Guardian website discusses the use of e-books and how they benefit students: http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/mar/15/ebooks-academic-future-universities-steven-schwartz 

E-Portfolios

What are E-Portfolios?

E-Portfolios are places where students can electronically collect their work and ideas dynamically over the lifetime of a course. E-Portfolios can encourage students to become more critically reflective learners. Such work can include text, electronic files, multimedia, images, blog entries and hyperlinks. E-Portfolios are used as pedagogic tools to enhance and evolve learning and teaching styles, skills development and students’ reflective learning as well as supporting personal development and planning during progression through courses.

How can E-Portfolios be used to advance student learning?

E-Portfolios help students to reflect on what they have learned over the course of an educational programme and how they plan to improve in the future. Such skills are integral to the development of students being critical thinks and helps to develop important transferable skills relating to their writing abilities, organisation and development as autonomous learners. E-Portfolios can facilitate students’ reflection on their own learning, leading to an increased awareness of learning strategies and their personal learning needs and the improvements required to enhance their learning to an advanced level.

Why should I use E-Portfolios?

E-Portfolios allow students to collect and manage their work electronically over the lifetime of a course. As such, e-portfolios are also demonstrations of the user’s abilities to maintain such a diverse platform of electronic learning. The rapid use of e-portfolios by many universities has led to numerous advantages for learning and teaching. This learning and teaching strategy leads to the development of student’s learning as well as becoming a diverse teaching and assessment technology.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where E-Portfolios have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     Newcastle University developed an E-Portfolio in 2002 as part of a collaborative project and have explored the pedagogic benefits of its use: http://www.eportfolios.ac.uk/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of E-Portfolios in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    The University of Nottingham has a detailed webpage on the advantages of e-portfolios: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/teaching/tools/eportfolios/index.aspx

2)    This YouTube video demonstrates the use of e-portfolios at the University of Derby: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZsfvBqBrcY

Blogs and Forums

What are Blogs and Forums?

Blogs are a major source of user-generated content on the internet. They are a quick, accessible and easy to make method which are a great way of giving students a wider audience to their assessed work. This results in students having access to multiple sources of feedback from peers rather tan just the one tutor, which in itself can lead to enhanced understanding and self-awareness. The shared environment allows students to view good places of assessed work produced by their peers, and by comparison with their own work, understand where the weaknesses highlighted in feedback on their own work lie. Students and tutors can develop their own blogging sites (on sites such as blogspot) that allow for multiple sources of feedback and the development of their understanding of subject matter. Twitter is a social media micro-blogging service, which is popular amongst students along with Facebook. Twitter is a great tool for sending and receiving short burst of information, normally relating to developing current stories gaining traction as well as development in other subject disciplines to groups of interested people. Twitter can be a useful learning and teaching tool in a Higher Education context as it has the potential to reach a wide audience. Online discussions (or Forums) can be used to extend learning beyond the boundaries of the classroom. Discussion forums can be set up in Moodle and other platforms.

How can Blogs and Forums be used to advance student learning?

The past 5 years have seen a skyrocketing of educational blogs in various subject areas. Such blogs are written by leaders and experts in their respective disciplines and students can encounter the most current, original and disciplinary significant information through blogs and forums. Blogs and forums are now perceived to be a significant online resource of academic information. In addition, a forum component can help develop and engage students by participating and collaborating in academic debates. Sites such as Twitter allow for immediate access to current events which helps students to engage and relate theoretical frameworks to real world contexts.

Why should I use Blogs and Forums?

Blogs and forums are massive sources of academic information. Frequently, this information is current and important to the relevant discipline. In addition, students can participate in academic debates which leads to higher levels of engagement and the development of subject knowledge. Writing blogs and contributing to forums are a useful learning and teaching technology as well as an assessment tool. This learning and teaching technology is an innovative method for engaging students in academic debates and appealing to a wider range of students learning styles.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where Blogs and Forums have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     This YouTube video highlights a case study of the use of blogs from the University of South Wales for peer feedback and discussion: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4HLGRzhWBs&feature=related

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of Blogs and Forums in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1) This YouTube video discusses the relevance of blogs and their role in disseminating information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN2I1pWXjXI

2) This website provides a guide to the use of blogs in teaching: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/ultimate-guide-to-use-of-blogs-in.html

Flipped Classrooms

What is Flipping the Classroom?

“Flipping the Classroom”, is the process of diverting the content usually delivered by passive, “chalk and talk” methods to online media outside the classroom. There are vast resources on the internet (e.g. Kahn Academy) where students can access entire courses in their chosen subject. Flipping the classroom asks students to access this content before arriving at the classroom, freeing classroom time up for more interesting activities. Flipping the classroom is a form of blended learning so that lecturers can spend more time interacting with students instead of focusing on instruction.

How can Flipping the Classroom be used to advance student learning?

There are numerous advantages to flipping the classroom. In conjunction with the use of learning technologies, a flipped classroom increases student engagement; interaction; development of subject knowledge; and increases participation and collaboration amongst students. These advantages lead to an enhanced performance by students in many aspects of their course, particularly in their assessments and engagement with subject content.

Why should I “flip the classroom”?

A flipped classroom is a learning and teaching technique employed by many lecturers. It is the emphasis on using student-lecturer content time for discussion rather than instruction which attracts educators to this technique. The multiple advantages of developing student’s subject knowledge; focusing on interaction and discussion; enhancing engagement and participation in core subject content result from the use of this learning and teaching strategy.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where flipping the classroom has been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     Salman Khan discusses the use of the Khan Academy and flipping the classroom to “reinvent education”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTFEUsudhfs

2)    This YouTube video explains the reasons why educators “flip the classroom” and the methods of delivery of academic information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2H4RkudFzlc

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of flipping the classroom in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This learning solutions website provides a helpful infographic about flipping the classroom and its outcomes: http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/

The Center for Instructional Technology at Duke University provides more information and resources about flipping the classroom. Click here for more information: http://cit.duke.edu/flipping-the-classroom/

Learning Objects

What are Learning Objects?

Learning Objects (LO) are digital learning resources often found in learning repositories, which normally take the form of interactive workshops, lecture material and worksheets. Learning Object repositories are websites that serve as a holding place for collections of teaching and learning objects. Learning Objects are reusable, durable and accessible. They provide instructional content, practice based elements and assessments for smaller, self-contained units of learning which comprise a particular element of a course 

How can Learning Objects be used to advance student learning?

Learning Objects have the capability to advance student learning in numerous ways. Learning Objects can be viewed as blocks that can be combined and reused to create a stimulating and diverse course design. This method of learning supports a wide range of learning techniques by students and are used to support the different kinds of online activities and interaction patterns with lecturers. This results in a flexible approach to learning as well as providing students with more choices about how, when and where they learn.

Why should I use Learning Objects?

Learning Objects offer a new conceptualisation of the learning process. Rather than the traditional identified portions of time, they provide smaller, self-contained units of learning with a number of different components. These components include: instructional content, practice based elements and assessment.  Extracting units of instruction from larger course structures have the potential to transform the design and delivery of educational content. Once stored in a repository, students can access them to support learning. The use of Learning Objects as a learning and teaching technology is one more tool that leads to a diversification in learning and assessment methods for students 

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where learning objects have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     In this YouTube video, Salman Khan discusses the use of Learning Objects in education: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM95HHI4gLk&playnext=1&list=PL38AD3C06766D487E&feature=results_main

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of learning objects in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This document provides a detailed overview and information about developing Learning Objects in higher education: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0219.pdf

2)    This wiki provides a detailed overview about the use and implementation of learning objects: http://wiki.alt.ac.uk/index.php/Learning_objects_and_repositories