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Teaching Technologies

This part of the University website is dedicated to improving student learning and teaching methods. Here, lecturers will find information and resources related to improving, and evolving, styles of higher education learning and teaching. On this page, you will find existing, current techniques and technologies detailed below that aim to develop and enhance the quality of learning and teaching at the University. 

 

Mobile Technologies

What is Mobile Technology?

Mobile technology is becoming ubiquitous, and readily accessible. Most students enrolling in 2013 will have access to a smartphone or tablet computer capable of accessing the internet and running applications that could support their learning. This trend of abundant ownership and use of smartphones and tablets is set to increase. Along with this trend, is the opportunity to use mobile technologies to support and develop the learning of students.

How can Mobile Technologies be used to advance student learning?

A range of accessible applications, podcasts, and information sharing files give rise to a wide range of potential opportunities to develop the learning styles of students, as well as the teaching styles of lecturers. Such opportunities allow for lectures and academic material to be placed online and accessed by students through particular sites such as YouTube.com/education and iTunes U. Utilising the application of mobile technology for the development of student learning in Higher Education with the traditional methods of university teaching (e.g. lectures and seminars) allow for a blended approach to learning and teaching.

Why should I use Mobile Technologies?

Utilising mobile technologies for student learning and advancing teaching styles can result in numerous advantages, for both students and lecturers. Firstly, they allow for a diversification in teaching methods. This diversification can accommodate for the different styles of student learning. The development and use of mobile technologies can assist in improving, and evolving, teaching styles and learning methods. Secondly, there are a vast array of existing applications that are available that could lend themselves well to courses taught at Liverpool Hope. These applications are often free or cheap to purchase. The use of these applications with the increasing ownership and use of mobile technology for educational purposes would save time preparing educational materials and teaching time.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where mobile technologies have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)    Lynn University, Florida offer courses using iTunes U and require students to purchase an iPad which is loaded with student’s core reading materials and course content. Over time, the device saves money for students purchasing textbooks. Additionally, this method allows for a “flipped classroom” where contact time is based on discussion, rather than instruction. More details can be found here: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/15/lynn-university-require-all-new-students-buy-ipads

2)     In 2010, Rutgers University, New Jersey utilised tablets to merge the benefits of instructor-led teaching and the power and flexibility of the iPad to produce a Masters level course in Digital Marketing. More details can be found here: http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning2-0/first-ipad-university-course/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of mobile technologies in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    iPads in Education provides an overview of the use of iPads for learning and teaching purposes. Additionally, it provides examples of applications that can be used for educational purposes for a variety of disciplines: http://www.ipadineducation.co.uk/iPad_in_Education/Welcome.html

2)    Apple in Education highlights a multitude of ways that mobile technologies such as iPads can be used to transform learning and teaching: http://www.apple.com/uk/education/

3)    iTunes U provides course material in one application. From the iTunes U app, students can play video or audio lectures and take notes that are synchronised with the lecture. They can read books and view presentations. In addition, iTunes U is integrated with iBooks and related textbooks can be downloaded and viewed on the iPad: http://www.apple.com/uk/education/itunes-u/

4)    The University of Liverpool showcases a range of apps that students and staff can use that will support their learning and teaching: http://www.liv.ac.uk/csd/mobile/pda/ipad/ipadapps.htm

Blended Learning

What is Blended Learning?

Blended learning occurs through utilising traditional and online teaching. Students spend a significant amount of time accessing information, and in particular educational information, online. This trend in accessing information online provides opportunities to utilise popular means of information delivery, in addition to the time spent within lecture theatres and classrooms. This approach to learning and teaching combines and aligns learning undertaken in the lecture feature as well as opportunities created online.

How can Blended Learning be used to advance student learning?

Blended learning utilises both traditional and online teaching methods to enhance and extend the learning opportunities of students. It utilises online Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), blogs, social networks and mobile technologies to create a holistic learning experience. Blended learning can help advance student learning by extending learning opportunities; promote learning in unique ways such as video, animations and other forms of multimedia; accommodate for a variety of learning styles; assist with retention; develop digital literacy; and access course content, as well as contribute to courses, electronically. There are also possibilities for the development of Electronic Personal Development and Planning (ePDP) 

Why should I use Blended Learning?

The online environment can provide many significant opportunities for increased student engagement, group work and self-testing. Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are the common delivery mechanism for blended learning. A blended learning approach is seen as having significant advantages, but in some cases, may have implications on student engagement. Its benefits are attributed to a more diverse delivery of information for university course, which help aid student learning as well as appeal to students with a range of learning styles.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where blended learning have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     The University of Wolverhampton website has a detailed section on their website outlining the advantages of blended learning and additional resources. Click here to see their page: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/default.aspx?page=18446

2)    This YouTube video highlights an example of best practice from the University of Bristol utilising a blended learning approach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wgxij_8mTYI

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of blended learning in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This Guardian article provides the context and development of blended learning in Higher Education: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/apr/19/distance-blended-learning-degrees

2)    The University of New South Wales video on using online environments to teaching large classes: http://online.cofa.unsw.edu.au/learning-to-teach-online/ltto-episodes?view=video&video=271

 

Audio/Video Feedback

What is Audio and Video Feedback?

Multimodal feedback such as audio and video feedback are becoming popular in schools and universities. Feedback should be the means by which learners, with the assistance of experts and peers, and through their own reflection, forge a deeper understanding of the knowledge and skills associated with a subject discipline. Transforming assessment practices providing audio and video feedback allow for the potential for conveniently accessed and personalised feedback. As such, audio and visual feedback can be accessed on a multitude of technologies such as MP3 players, iPods, smartphones and personal or workplace computers.

How can Audio and Video Feedback be used to advance student learning?

Audio and Video Feedback for assignments have numerous advantages that can assist with the development of student learning. Firstly, they allow for feedback to be personalised. Secondly, they allow for a convenient replacement or addition to written feedback where points can be expanded upon. Thirdly, audio and video feedback allow for students to receive and act upon more detailed responses from staff. Finally, software can be purchased or downloaded (such as Jing) that allows staff to highlight particular parts of assignments and record detailed feedback.

Why should I use Audio and Feedback?

Audio and Video Feedback allows for quicker marking of assignments than writing out feedback sheets. In addition, audio and video feedback allow for more detailed feedback regarding the students assessment. Feedback in this format is more specific, can be conveniently accessed and personalised. The University of Leicester has implemented audio and video feedback for its MSc Occupational Psychology course and have reported numerous advantages for students and tutors. The University of Leicester report that many learners find feedback via digital audio more detailed and helpful. In contrast, written feedback is perceived as brief, unclear and difficult to recall 

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where Audio and Video Feedback have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     The University of Leicester have utilised audio and video feedback for assessments on their MSc Occupational Psychology course. Click here for more details: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearning/digiassess_enhancingfeedbk.pdf

2)    The University of Derby have also used audio feedback to provide feedback on the MA in Education. Click here for more details: http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/learning-enhancement/learning-teaching/assessment-feedback/feedback/audio/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of Audio and Video Feedback in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This YouTube video demonstrates how to mark assignments on an iPad using iAnnotate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieFqPYCO0sc

2)    This YouTube video demonstrates how to mark assignments using Google Docs and a free downloadable software package called Jing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE3cP22fG30

SMARTboards

What are SMARTboards?

SMARTboards are available in every classroom in Liverpool Hope University. They are capable of being so much more than a whiteboard. SMARTboards are an interactive whiteboard that uses touch detection for user input in the same way as normal computer devices. Their potential to improve learning and teaching is underestimated and not well understood. The use of SMARTboards in seminars and workshops, if used as part of a “flipped classroom” can lead to higher levels of student engagement and interactivity.

How can SMARTboards be used to advance student learning?

The effective use of SMARTboards can offer an information space that allows students to engage in active collaboration in the classroom. SMARTboards are one example of a multitude of ways of communicating information in a range of classroom settings. It is this diversity of learning and teaching technologies that appeal to differing types of learning styles by students. An additional element to SMARTboards is that it increases interactivity between students and lecturers.

Why should I use SMARTboards?

SMARTboards can lead to higher levels of student engagement, active collaboration in the classroom from students and increasing levels of interactivity. In addition, SMARTboards diversify teaching methods which allow for students to learn through differing ways of teaching.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where SMARTboards have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     This YouTube video demonstrates how SMARTboards can be used in an educational context and the benefits of using them: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U05WeXPGlk

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of SMARTboards in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    A guide to using SMARTboards effectively from Southampton University. Click here for more details: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/isolutions/computing/training/portfolio/smartboard/outlines.php?coursecode=CATSMRTINK

MOOCs

What is a MOOC?

MOOCs are Massive Open Online Courses. MOOC’s use the internet, multimedia technology and asynchronous communication to allow hundreds or even thousands of students to take a course remotely from any location in the world. Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and more recently the Open University have between them hundreds of thousands of students enrolled to their MOOC’s, with full university credit granted on completion. MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community of staff and students.

How can MOOCs be used to advance student learning?

MOOCs can be used in numerous ways to advance student learning. Although there is no replacement for face-to-face interaction, MOOCs can enrich those interactions through the development of online courses. Content is delivered via video lectures, discussion forums and peer-marked assignments. In addition, MOOCs help to develop an online students community in addition to face-to-face interactions. Students on the course link up, share experiences and understandings of the course and critique each other’s work. MOOCs are a way of connecting and collaborating whilst enhancing digital literacy and skills which enhance student learning. 

Why should I use MOOCs?

MOOCs are a recent development in the provision of higher education learning and teaching. Their advantages are numerous in terms of registering students on to courses as well as a different method of disseminating course content to students through a wide variety of teaching methods such as PowerPoint slides, video lectures and discussion forums. 

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of MOOCs in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This YouTube video provides an overview of what a MOOC is and the advantages of implementing a MOOC: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3gMGqcZQc

2)    This website highlights 10 sites that provide MOOCs: http://www.bdpa-detroit.org/portal/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57:moocs-top-10-sites-for-free-education-with-elite-universities&catid=29:education&Itemid=20

3)    Coursera is an educational company that partners with universities to offer online courses: https://www.coursera.org/

Mobile Technologies

What is Mobile Technology?

Mobile technology is becoming ubiquitous, and readily accessible. Most students enrolling in 2013 will have access to a smartphone or tablet computer capable of accessing the internet and running applications that could support their learning. This trend of abundant ownership and use of smartphones and tablets is set to increase. Along with this trend, is the opportunity to use mobile technologies to support and develop the learning of students.

How can Mobile Technologies be used to advance student learning?

A range of accessible applications, podcasts, and information sharing files give rise to a wide range of potential opportunities to develop the learning styles of students, as well as the teaching styles of lecturers. Such opportunities allow for lectures and academic material to be placed online and accessed by students through particular sites such as YouTube.com/education and iTunes U. Utilising the application of mobile technology for the development of student learning in Higher Education with the traditional methods of university teaching (e.g. lectures and seminars) allow for a blended approach to learning and teaching.

Why should I use Mobile Technologies?

Utilising mobile technologies for student learning and advancing teaching styles can result in numerous advantages, for both students and lecturers. Firstly, they allow for a diversification in teaching methods. This diversification can accommodate for the different styles of student learning. The development and use of mobile technologies can assist in improving, and evolving, teaching styles and learning methods. Secondly, there are a vast array of existing applications that are available that could lend themselves well to courses taught at Liverpool Hope. These applications are often free or cheap to purchase. The use of these applications with the increasing ownership and use of mobile technology for educational purposes would save time preparing educational materials and teaching time.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where mobile technologies have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)    Lynn University, Florida offer courses using iTunes U and require students to purchase an iPad which is loaded with student’s core reading materials and course content. Over time, the device saves money for students purchasing textbooks. Additionally, this method allows for a “flipped classroom” where contact time is based on discussion, rather than instruction. More details can be found here: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/15/lynn-university-require-all-new-students-buy-ipads

2)     In 2010, Rutgers University, New Jersey utilised tablets to merge the benefits of instructor-led teaching and the power and flexibility of the iPad to produce a Masters level course in Digital Marketing. More details can be found here: http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning2-0/first-ipad-university-course/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of mobile technologies in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    iPads in Education provides an overview of the use of iPads for learning and teaching purposes. Additionally, it provides examples of applications that can be used for educational purposes for a variety of disciplines: http://www.ipadineducation.co.uk/iPad_in_Education/Welcome.html

2)    Apple in Education highlights a multitude of ways that mobile technologies such as iPads can be used to transform learning and teaching: http://www.apple.com/uk/education/

3)    iTunes U provides course material in one application. From the iTunes U app, students can play video or audio lectures and take notes that are synchronised with the lecture. They can read books and view presentations. In addition, iTunes U is integrated with iBooks and related textbooks can be downloaded and viewed on the iPad: http://www.apple.com/uk/education/itunes-u/

4)    The University of Liverpool showcases a range of apps that students and staff can use that will support their learning and teaching: http://www.liv.ac.uk/csd/mobile/pda/ipad/ipadapps.htm

Blended Learning

What is Blended Learning?

Blended learning occurs through utilising traditional and online teaching. Students spend a significant amount of time accessing information, and in particular educational information, online. This trend in accessing information online provides opportunities to utilise popular means of information delivery, in addition to the time spent within lecture theatres and classrooms. This approach to learning and teaching combines and aligns learning undertaken in the lecture feature as well as opportunities created online.

How can Blended Learning be used to advance student learning?

Blended learning utilises both traditional and online teaching methods to enhance and extend the learning opportunities of students. It utilises online Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), blogs, social networks and mobile technologies to create a holistic learning experience. Blended learning can help advance student learning by extending learning opportunities; promote learning in unique ways such as video, animations and other forms of multimedia; accommodate for a variety of learning styles; assist with retention; develop digital literacy; and access course content, as well as contribute to courses, electronically. There are also possibilities for the development of Electronic Personal Development and Planning (ePDP) 

Why should I use Blended Learning?

The online environment can provide many significant opportunities for increased student engagement, group work and self-testing. Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are the common delivery mechanism for blended learning. A blended learning approach is seen as having significant advantages, but in some cases, may have implications on student engagement. Its benefits are attributed to a more diverse delivery of information for university course, which help aid student learning as well as appeal to students with a range of learning styles.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where blended learning have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     The University of Wolverhampton website has a detailed section on their website outlining the advantages of blended learning and additional resources. Click here to see their page: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/default.aspx?page=18446

2)    This YouTube video highlights an example of best practice from the University of Bristol utilising a blended learning approach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wgxij_8mTYI

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of blended learning in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This Guardian article provides the context and development of blended learning in Higher Education: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/apr/19/distance-blended-learning-degrees

2)    The University of New South Wales video on using online environments to teaching large classes: http://online.cofa.unsw.edu.au/learning-to-teach-online/ltto-episodes?view=video&video=271

 

Audio/Video Feedback

What is Audio and Video Feedback?

Multimodal feedback such as audio and video feedback are becoming popular in schools and universities. Feedback should be the means by which learners, with the assistance of experts and peers, and through their own reflection, forge a deeper understanding of the knowledge and skills associated with a subject discipline. Transforming assessment practices providing audio and video feedback allow for the potential for conveniently accessed and personalised feedback. As such, audio and visual feedback can be accessed on a multitude of technologies such as MP3 players, iPods, smartphones and personal or workplace computers.

How can Audio and Video Feedback be used to advance student learning?

Audio and Video Feedback for assignments have numerous advantages that can assist with the development of student learning. Firstly, they allow for feedback to be personalised. Secondly, they allow for a convenient replacement or addition to written feedback where points can be expanded upon. Thirdly, audio and video feedback allow for students to receive and act upon more detailed responses from staff. Finally, software can be purchased or downloaded (such as Jing) that allows staff to highlight particular parts of assignments and record detailed feedback.

Why should I use Audio and Feedback?

Audio and Video Feedback allows for quicker marking of assignments than writing out feedback sheets. In addition, audio and video feedback allow for more detailed feedback regarding the students assessment. Feedback in this format is more specific, can be conveniently accessed and personalised. The University of Leicester has implemented audio and video feedback for its MSc Occupational Psychology course and have reported numerous advantages for students and tutors. The University of Leicester report that many learners find feedback via digital audio more detailed and helpful. In contrast, written feedback is perceived as brief, unclear and difficult to recall 

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where Audio and Video Feedback have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     The University of Leicester have utilised audio and video feedback for assessments on their MSc Occupational Psychology course. Click here for more details: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearning/digiassess_enhancingfeedbk.pdf

2)    The University of Derby have also used audio feedback to provide feedback on the MA in Education. Click here for more details: http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/learning-enhancement/learning-teaching/assessment-feedback/feedback/audio/

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of Audio and Video Feedback in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This YouTube video demonstrates how to mark assignments on an iPad using iAnnotate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieFqPYCO0sc

2)    This YouTube video demonstrates how to mark assignments using Google Docs and a free downloadable software package called Jing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE3cP22fG30

SMARTboards

What are SMARTboards?

SMARTboards are available in every classroom in Liverpool Hope University. They are capable of being so much more than a whiteboard. SMARTboards are an interactive whiteboard that uses touch detection for user input in the same way as normal computer devices. Their potential to improve learning and teaching is underestimated and not well understood. The use of SMARTboards in seminars and workshops, if used as part of a “flipped classroom” can lead to higher levels of student engagement and interactivity.

How can SMARTboards be used to advance student learning?

The effective use of SMARTboards can offer an information space that allows students to engage in active collaboration in the classroom. SMARTboards are one example of a multitude of ways of communicating information in a range of classroom settings. It is this diversity of learning and teaching technologies that appeal to differing types of learning styles by students. An additional element to SMARTboards is that it increases interactivity between students and lecturers.

Why should I use SMARTboards?

SMARTboards can lead to higher levels of student engagement, active collaboration in the classroom from students and increasing levels of interactivity. In addition, SMARTboards diversify teaching methods which allow for students to learn through differing ways of teaching.

Examples of best practice:

The following links below highlight examples of best practice where SMARTboards have been incorporated in higher education institutions:

1)     This YouTube video demonstrates how SMARTboards can be used in an educational context and the benefits of using them: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U05WeXPGlk

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of SMARTboards in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    A guide to using SMARTboards effectively from Southampton University. Click here for more details: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/isolutions/computing/training/portfolio/smartboard/outlines.php?coursecode=CATSMRTINK

MOOCs

What is a MOOC?

MOOCs are Massive Open Online Courses. MOOC’s use the internet, multimedia technology and asynchronous communication to allow hundreds or even thousands of students to take a course remotely from any location in the world. Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and more recently the Open University have between them hundreds of thousands of students enrolled to their MOOC’s, with full university credit granted on completion. MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community of staff and students.

How can MOOCs be used to advance student learning?

MOOCs can be used in numerous ways to advance student learning. Although there is no replacement for face-to-face interaction, MOOCs can enrich those interactions through the development of online courses. Content is delivered via video lectures, discussion forums and peer-marked assignments. In addition, MOOCs help to develop an online students community in addition to face-to-face interactions. Students on the course link up, share experiences and understandings of the course and critique each other’s work. MOOCs are a way of connecting and collaborating whilst enhancing digital literacy and skills which enhance student learning. 

Why should I use MOOCs?

MOOCs are a recent development in the provision of higher education learning and teaching. Their advantages are numerous in terms of registering students on to courses as well as a different method of disseminating course content to students through a wide variety of teaching methods such as PowerPoint slides, video lectures and discussion forums. 

Additional resources:

The following links below are provided to allow for lecturers to explore the role of MOOCs in education; the advantages of its use for learning and teaching; as well as other accessible resources that may be useful:

1)    This YouTube video provides an overview of what a MOOC is and the advantages of implementing a MOOC: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3gMGqcZQc

2)    This website highlights 10 sites that provide MOOCs: http://www.bdpa-detroit.org/portal/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57:moocs-top-10-sites-for-free-education-with-elite-universities&catid=29:education&Itemid=20

3)    Coursera is an educational company that partners with universities to offer online courses: https://www.coursera.org/