Tolkien Day Study Liverpool Hope University,Study,Departments and Faculties,Faculty of Arts and Humanities,Department of English

Department of English

Tolkien Day

Friday 11th November 2016

Overview

Tolkien lovers are in for a treat as Liverpool Hope University dedicates a day to The Lord of the Rings author and his lesser known links to Liverpool Hope University. 

Alan Lee, Academy Award winning Concept Artist for The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit films will headline Tolkien Day at Liverpool Hope University on Friday 11th November. 

As well as discussing the films, fans and literature lovers will have the chance to learn about Tolkien’s early manuscripts, his experience of World War 1, his faith - and his hidden links to Liverpool.

Tolkien was part of a team based at what is now Liverpool Hope University, who translated and edited The Jerusalem Bible. The Jerusalem Bible was the first translation of the whole Bible into modern English and celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Tolkien’s translation of The Book of Jonah is admired for both its beauty and accuracy.

Attendees will also be among the first to view a Latin Dictionary, owned and signed by Tolkien, and recently discovered in the Liverpool Hope University library.

Speakers on the day include John Garth, author of Tolkien and the Great War, Edmund Weiner, co-editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, Liverpool Hope University Alumnus Lord David Alton, and Stuart Lee and Elizabeth Solopova from the University of Oxford.

The day will conclude with a free showing of Tolkien’s The Return of the King (2003). 

The event is FREE and open to individuals, schools and colleges. Attendees do not have to attend for the full day, and they are also invited to come along dressed as their favourite Tolkien character. Booking is necessary to secure a place.

To book your FREE place visit the Online Store

For school group bookings contact Andrew Cooper on 0151 291 3739 or coopera@hope.ac.uk  
 
For further information about the conference please contact Dr Lisa Walters 
 
Ian McKellen
"All best wishes for a hugely successful event. Yours, Ian McKellen"
 

Programme

 

TimeActivity
11.00am Welcome - Lisa Walters, Department of English, Liverpool Hope University
11.10am  ‘Fairies and Goblins in British Folklore: Tolkien’s ‘Goblin Feet’’ Guy Cuthbertson and Lisa Walters (Literature, Liverpool Hope University)
11.40am Break
11.45am ‘Tolkien’s Manuscripts: From Moria to Milwaukee’ Stuart Lee (Literature, University of Oxford)
12.30pm Lunch
1.30pm ‘I am not specially interested in children, and certainly not in writing for them’ - J.R.R. Tolkien’s views on children’s literature’ Elizabeth Solopova (Linguistics, University of Oxford)
2.15pm Break
2.20pm 'Diction and narrative in ‘The Lord of the Rings’ Edmund Weiner, Deputy Chief Editor of the Oxford English Dictionary
3.00pm  Break 
3.10pm ‘The Great Wave: Tolkien’s Atlantis myth, the 1930s crisis of civilisation, and the bridge to The Lord of the Rings.’ John Garth (author of Tolkien and the Great War)
3.55pm Break
4.00pm ‘Tolkien and Faith’ Lord David Alton, former MP of Liverpool Mossley Hill and Liverpool Hope Alumnus
4.30pm Break
5.15pm Alan Lee, Academy Award winning Concept Artist of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit films
6.30-10.00pm Free screening of Tolkien’s The Return of the King (2003)

Final Tolkien programme

Speakers

Our speakers include:

Mr Alan Lee 

Alan Lee 150x150

Alan Lee was born and raised in London, where he studied graphic art and design. Enchanted by myth and folklore from an early age, he gravitated toward the field of book illustration. Alan worked as an illustrator in London until the mid-1970s, when he moved to Dartmoor, along with Brian Froud. At the suggestion of Ian Ballantine (the legendary American publisher), Alan, Brian and the designer David Larkin created the book Faeries, inspired by the Dartmoor countryside and European fairy lore. ‌

Amongst other works Alan has also illustrated The Mabinogion, Castles, Merlin Dreams, and Black Ships Before Troy: The Story of the Illiad (winner of the prestigious Kate Greenaway Award), and the  centenary edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, as well as The Hobbit.

 For six years, however, book projects were set aside while he worked in New Zealand  on Peter Jackson's film trilogy, The Lord of the Rings. As conceptual designer for the films, it was Alan's job to help create the distinctive "look" of Middle Earth. He was involved in all aspects of the design of the films - particularly with the miniatures, sets and visual effects - and in 2004 he received an Academy Award for his work. After returning to Devon in September, 2004, Alan worked on some of his own projects, as well as producing a new book, “The Lord of the Rings Sketchbook” which gives an insight into some of the working processes involved in both book illustration and designing for film. He also illustrated “Shapeshifters” - a retelling, by Adrian Mitchell, of Ovid’s Metamorphoses.  In 2009 Alan returned to New Zealand to work on “the hobbit” films, along with John Howe, and the designers at Weta Workshop. This project turned into another six year epic!

When not working on film locations, Alan makes his home in Devon, England, where his studio takes up two floors of a granite   barn.  His interests include myth and folklore, literature, poetry, music and history, and long walks through Devon woodland. Alan’s daughter Virginia is also a talented sculptor and illustrator.  

 “As an illustrator, my aim is not to dictate how things should look, but to serve the authors vision, and to create an atmosphere, a space between the words where the eye and mind can wander, and imagine for themselves …what will happen next.”

 — Alan Lee

Mr Lee's presentation and talk will follow Alan’s career through publishing and film designs, focussing in particular on The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy.  

The Rt. Hon Professor the Lord Alton of Liverpool 

Lord AltonDavid Alton served for 18 years as a Liverpool Member of Parliament before stepping down in 1997 when he was raised to the Peerage and became an Independent Crossbench Peer. He was first elected, while a student at Christ College, to Liverpool City Council becoming its Deputy Leader and Housing Chairman. He was the youngest  member of the House of Commons and later became his party’s Chief Whip and held several Front Bench portfolios.

He currently serves in Parliament as Chair of the All Party Group on North Korea and as Vice Chair or Officer of several other APGs. For his work on human rights he was created a Papal Knight by the Pope and in 2016 was awarded the Thomas More Religious Freedom Award.  

Author of eleven books, for twenty years he held the Roscoe Chair in Citizenship at LJMU, where he is an honorary Fellow, and is a Visiting Fellow at the University of St.Andrews. Full biography at: https://davidalton.net/about/

Tolkien: Faith and Fiction

This talk will look at Tolkien’s fiction through the lens of faith. Tolkien said that The Lord of the Rings was “a religious work”. What did he mean by that and what clues are there in the characters, the tales within the tale, and within the plot itself?  And what do we learn about Tolkien’s own Christian faith through his membership of the Inklings and his friendship with C. S. Lewis. 

Dr Stuart Lee

Dr Stuart LeeDr Stuart D Lee is a Reader at Oxford University and member of the English Faculty and Merton College. He lectures on Old English, World War One literature, and the life and work of J. R. R. Tolkien. He has published two editions of The Keys of Middle-earth: Discovering Medieval Literature through the Fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien with his colleague Dr Elizabeth Solopova. He edited the Blackwells/Wiley A Companion to J. R. R. Tolkien’, and has just finished the four-volume Major Works on Tolkien for Routledge (due out in 2016). He has published scholarly articles on Tolkien (his manuscripts, his work on key medieval texts) and is researching into the 1968 TV show ‘Tolkien in Oxford’ (BBC). He has published extensively on Old English, Digital Humanities, and WW1 poetry and was the director on Oxford’s First World War Poetry Digital Archive project. He is also a published playwright.

Tolkien’s Manuscripts: From Moria to Milwaukee

In this paper I will attempt to show the inextricable link between Tolkien’s work as a medievalist and as a mythmaker through his knowledge of manuscripts. I will consider Tolkien’s own unpublished manuscripts (notably in the Bodleian library), the manuscripts of his novels and what this tells us about his writing (mainly held in Marquette University, Milwaukee), and the appearance of manuscripts in Middle-earth – an example of how Tolkien used his academic knowledge to create depth for his world.

Edmund Weiner

Edmund Weiner  Edmund Weiner was born in Oxford. He first read The Lord of the Rings at school there in 1963 and has been rereading it ever since, which probably accounts for his career. After studying and teaching Old and Middle English and the history of the English language, he joined the staff of the Oxford English Dictionary in 1977 and is now one of the Deputy Chief Editors. His other research interests include English grammar and the language of early modern English non-literary documents. He is a co-author of The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the OED (2006) and ‘Tolkien's Invented Languages’ in Michael Adams From Elvish to Klingon (2011)

Diction and narrative in ‘The Lord of the Rings’ 

I think that The Lord of the Rings is as carefully crafted language wise as Tolkien's drawings and designs are visually. There is a carefully considered use of diction forming patterns that constitute part of the narrative structure of the story. As a brief essay in the analysis of Tolkien's methods, this paper considers the meanings, contexts, and narrative distribution of one word.

John Garth

John Garth John Garth is internationally known for Tolkien and the Great War, winner of the Mythopoeic Award for Scholarship, and has shared his expertise internationally in talks, in print, online and on screen. He has spent the past year in Las Vegas as Fellow in Humanistic Studies at the Black Mountain Institute, Nevada, writing a further book on Tolkien’s creative development in the context of his times.    

The Great Wave: Tolkien’s Atlantis myth, the 1930s crisis of civilisation, and the bridge to The Lord of the Rings.

For as long as he could remember, Tolkien was haunted by a dream of a wave devouring a green land. Since the 1914–18 war, he had been crafting the Silmarillion stories of the “Elder Days” of Middle-earth. But it was only the deepening international crisis of the 1930s that impelled him to insert the dream of the Great Wave into his legendarium. In creating the Atlantis-story of Númenor, a high civilisation destroyed by its own greed and hubris, Tolkien paved the way for The Lord of the Rings. Through fresh analysis of the story, its date and its historical context, new light is shed on the long controversy over the relationship between the “Dark Lord” Sauron and the 20th-century dictatorships.

 

 

Overview

Tolkien lovers are in for a treat as Liverpool Hope University dedicates a day to The Lord of the Rings author and his lesser known links to Liverpool Hope University. 

Alan Lee, Academy Award winning Concept Artist for The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit films will headline Tolkien Day at Liverpool Hope University on Friday 11th November. 

As well as discussing the films, fans and literature lovers will have the chance to learn about Tolkien’s early manuscripts, his experience of World War 1, his faith - and his hidden links to Liverpool.

Tolkien was part of a team based at what is now Liverpool Hope University, who translated and edited The Jerusalem Bible. The Jerusalem Bible was the first translation of the whole Bible into modern English and celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Tolkien’s translation of The Book of Jonah is admired for both its beauty and accuracy.

Attendees will also be among the first to view a Latin Dictionary, owned and signed by Tolkien, and recently discovered in the Liverpool Hope University library.

Speakers on the day include John Garth, author of Tolkien and the Great War, Edmund Weiner, co-editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, Liverpool Hope University Alumnus Lord David Alton, and Stuart Lee and Elizabeth Solopova from the University of Oxford.

The day will conclude with a free showing of Tolkien’s The Return of the King (2003). 

The event is FREE and open to individuals, schools and colleges. Attendees do not have to attend for the full day, and they are also invited to come along dressed as their favourite Tolkien character. Booking is necessary to secure a place.

To book your FREE place visit the Online Store

For school group bookings contact Andrew Cooper on 0151 291 3739 or coopera@hope.ac.uk  
 
For further information about the conference please contact Dr Lisa Walters 
 
Ian McKellen
"All best wishes for a hugely successful event. Yours, Ian McKellen"
 

Programme

 

TimeActivity
11.00am Welcome - Lisa Walters, Department of English, Liverpool Hope University
11.10am  ‘Fairies and Goblins in British Folklore: Tolkien’s ‘Goblin Feet’’ Guy Cuthbertson and Lisa Walters (Literature, Liverpool Hope University)
11.40am Break
11.45am ‘Tolkien’s Manuscripts: From Moria to Milwaukee’ Stuart Lee (Literature, University of Oxford)
12.30pm Lunch
1.30pm ‘I am not specially interested in children, and certainly not in writing for them’ - J.R.R. Tolkien’s views on children’s literature’ Elizabeth Solopova (Linguistics, University of Oxford)
2.15pm Break
2.20pm 'Diction and narrative in ‘The Lord of the Rings’ Edmund Weiner, Deputy Chief Editor of the Oxford English Dictionary
3.00pm  Break 
3.10pm ‘The Great Wave: Tolkien’s Atlantis myth, the 1930s crisis of civilisation, and the bridge to The Lord of the Rings.’ John Garth (author of Tolkien and the Great War)
3.55pm Break
4.00pm ‘Tolkien and Faith’ Lord David Alton, former MP of Liverpool Mossley Hill and Liverpool Hope Alumnus
4.30pm Break
5.15pm Alan Lee, Academy Award winning Concept Artist of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit films
6.30-10.00pm Free screening of Tolkien’s The Return of the King (2003)

Final Tolkien programme

Speakers

Our speakers include:

Mr Alan Lee 

Alan Lee 150x150

Alan Lee was born and raised in London, where he studied graphic art and design. Enchanted by myth and folklore from an early age, he gravitated toward the field of book illustration. Alan worked as an illustrator in London until the mid-1970s, when he moved to Dartmoor, along with Brian Froud. At the suggestion of Ian Ballantine (the legendary American publisher), Alan, Brian and the designer David Larkin created the book Faeries, inspired by the Dartmoor countryside and European fairy lore. ‌

Amongst other works Alan has also illustrated The Mabinogion, Castles, Merlin Dreams, and Black Ships Before Troy: The Story of the Illiad (winner of the prestigious Kate Greenaway Award), and the  centenary edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, as well as The Hobbit.

 For six years, however, book projects were set aside while he worked in New Zealand  on Peter Jackson's film trilogy, The Lord of the Rings. As conceptual designer for the films, it was Alan's job to help create the distinctive "look" of Middle Earth. He was involved in all aspects of the design of the films - particularly with the miniatures, sets and visual effects - and in 2004 he received an Academy Award for his work. After returning to Devon in September, 2004, Alan worked on some of his own projects, as well as producing a new book, “The Lord of the Rings Sketchbook” which gives an insight into some of the working processes involved in both book illustration and designing for film. He also illustrated “Shapeshifters” - a retelling, by Adrian Mitchell, of Ovid’s Metamorphoses.  In 2009 Alan returned to New Zealand to work on “the hobbit” films, along with John Howe, and the designers at Weta Workshop. This project turned into another six year epic!

When not working on film locations, Alan makes his home in Devon, England, where his studio takes up two floors of a granite   barn.  His interests include myth and folklore, literature, poetry, music and history, and long walks through Devon woodland. Alan’s daughter Virginia is also a talented sculptor and illustrator.  

 “As an illustrator, my aim is not to dictate how things should look, but to serve the authors vision, and to create an atmosphere, a space between the words where the eye and mind can wander, and imagine for themselves …what will happen next.”

 — Alan Lee

Mr Lee's presentation and talk will follow Alan’s career through publishing and film designs, focussing in particular on The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy.  

The Rt. Hon Professor the Lord Alton of Liverpool 

Lord AltonDavid Alton served for 18 years as a Liverpool Member of Parliament before stepping down in 1997 when he was raised to the Peerage and became an Independent Crossbench Peer. He was first elected, while a student at Christ College, to Liverpool City Council becoming its Deputy Leader and Housing Chairman. He was the youngest  member of the House of Commons and later became his party’s Chief Whip and held several Front Bench portfolios.

He currently serves in Parliament as Chair of the All Party Group on North Korea and as Vice Chair or Officer of several other APGs. For his work on human rights he was created a Papal Knight by the Pope and in 2016 was awarded the Thomas More Religious Freedom Award.  

Author of eleven books, for twenty years he held the Roscoe Chair in Citizenship at LJMU, where he is an honorary Fellow, and is a Visiting Fellow at the University of St.Andrews. Full biography at: https://davidalton.net/about/

Tolkien: Faith and Fiction

This talk will look at Tolkien’s fiction through the lens of faith. Tolkien said that The Lord of the Rings was “a religious work”. What did he mean by that and what clues are there in the characters, the tales within the tale, and within the plot itself?  And what do we learn about Tolkien’s own Christian faith through his membership of the Inklings and his friendship with C. S. Lewis. 

Dr Stuart Lee

Dr Stuart LeeDr Stuart D Lee is a Reader at Oxford University and member of the English Faculty and Merton College. He lectures on Old English, World War One literature, and the life and work of J. R. R. Tolkien. He has published two editions of The Keys of Middle-earth: Discovering Medieval Literature through the Fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien with his colleague Dr Elizabeth Solopova. He edited the Blackwells/Wiley A Companion to J. R. R. Tolkien’, and has just finished the four-volume Major Works on Tolkien for Routledge (due out in 2016). He has published scholarly articles on Tolkien (his manuscripts, his work on key medieval texts) and is researching into the 1968 TV show ‘Tolkien in Oxford’ (BBC). He has published extensively on Old English, Digital Humanities, and WW1 poetry and was the director on Oxford’s First World War Poetry Digital Archive project. He is also a published playwright.

Tolkien’s Manuscripts: From Moria to Milwaukee

In this paper I will attempt to show the inextricable link between Tolkien’s work as a medievalist and as a mythmaker through his knowledge of manuscripts. I will consider Tolkien’s own unpublished manuscripts (notably in the Bodleian library), the manuscripts of his novels and what this tells us about his writing (mainly held in Marquette University, Milwaukee), and the appearance of manuscripts in Middle-earth – an example of how Tolkien used his academic knowledge to create depth for his world.

Edmund Weiner

Edmund Weiner  Edmund Weiner was born in Oxford. He first read The Lord of the Rings at school there in 1963 and has been rereading it ever since, which probably accounts for his career. After studying and teaching Old and Middle English and the history of the English language, he joined the staff of the Oxford English Dictionary in 1977 and is now one of the Deputy Chief Editors. His other research interests include English grammar and the language of early modern English non-literary documents. He is a co-author of The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the OED (2006) and ‘Tolkien's Invented Languages’ in Michael Adams From Elvish to Klingon (2011)

Diction and narrative in ‘The Lord of the Rings’ 

I think that The Lord of the Rings is as carefully crafted language wise as Tolkien's drawings and designs are visually. There is a carefully considered use of diction forming patterns that constitute part of the narrative structure of the story. As a brief essay in the analysis of Tolkien's methods, this paper considers the meanings, contexts, and narrative distribution of one word.

John Garth

John Garth John Garth is internationally known for Tolkien and the Great War, winner of the Mythopoeic Award for Scholarship, and has shared his expertise internationally in talks, in print, online and on screen. He has spent the past year in Las Vegas as Fellow in Humanistic Studies at the Black Mountain Institute, Nevada, writing a further book on Tolkien’s creative development in the context of his times.    

The Great Wave: Tolkien’s Atlantis myth, the 1930s crisis of civilisation, and the bridge to The Lord of the Rings.

For as long as he could remember, Tolkien was haunted by a dream of a wave devouring a green land. Since the 1914–18 war, he had been crafting the Silmarillion stories of the “Elder Days” of Middle-earth. But it was only the deepening international crisis of the 1930s that impelled him to insert the dream of the Great Wave into his legendarium. In creating the Atlantis-story of Númenor, a high civilisation destroyed by its own greed and hubris, Tolkien paved the way for The Lord of the Rings. Through fresh analysis of the story, its date and its historical context, new light is shed on the long controversy over the relationship between the “Dark Lord” Sauron and the 20th-century dictatorships.